Review: Exposed by Bey Deckard

ExposedRating: 4.25 stars
Buy Link:
Amazon | iBooks | Amazon UK
Length: Novel


Greg’s true passion is photography, but it’s his day job as a web designer that pays the bills. Behind the camera, Greg can let his passion come out when he can direct his models and expose their pleasure. But Greg has been paying for a past mistake for years now and the camera is what protects him from the rest of the world. He tells himself he’s fine being alone, but he won’t let himself admit that he is also lonely. A chance meeting puts the much younger Emyr in his path and although the men are vastly different, Greg is captivated.

Emyr is on the verge of stardom, but the song he is most known for has put his life in turmoil. With nowhere to go and no one to confide in, Emyr sits alone in the rain until fate steps in. Emyr immediately trusts Greg and when the men wind up back at Greg’s hotel room, an erotic photo shoot has both men craving more. But Greg can’t trust himself, he can’t get past the age difference, and he has specific needs that he’s kept locked down for years. Emyr is completely inexperienced and when Greg learns he’s a virgin, his first thought is to run. But when Emyr is persistent, Greg is unable to stay away and Greg will have to leave the past behind if he hopes to have a future with Emyr.

opposites attract copyWhoa Daddy — and that there is something I never thought I would have a reason to say. Daddy kink is not what I will usually pick up, but leave it to Bey Deckard to have me reading it as I will read just about anything he writes. I will also classify this as daddy kink light, which worked to my advantage here. Deckard has a remarkable and visual way with his writing that can transport you to a location or place you right in the center of a conversation and while I know to expect it with his work, I still am impressed each and every time.

While Exposed is told from Greg’s point of view, it is equally the story of both men. Greg is 20 years older than Emyr and his tastes have always been specific. He likes to dominate his partners, he likes to see tears and pain mixed in with the pleasure, and he wants to hurt his partners as much as he wants to heal them. His last relationship blew up on him, he took all of the blame, and he’s remained celibate for the past five years.

His meeting with Emyr is by chance and their connection is immediate. You have to go with this a bit as Emyr, who is a recognizable musician, gives over his complete trust to Greg within hours (or less) of meeting him. What ensues is a highly erotic and sensual photo shoot that leaves you wondering whether Greg or Emyr is doing the seducing. And that’s a key point here as this book is incredibly seductive as the men break through each other’s barriers. Deckard is able to skillfully show Greg being in full control of the photo shoots on the outside, while simultaneously coming undone on the inside at the sight of Emyr. Emyr feels safe with Greg and the daddy kink develops naturally for the men out of that. But Emyr lets Greg have a more gentle dynamic and his need to dominate has been seemingly tempered over the years as well as by Emyr himself. And even though Greg is older, he has a lot of issues to work through and Emyr remains a good match for him in maturity.

Which brings us to Greg’s issues, which ran deep, and a lot of his hesitation with being with Emyr stems from his last relationship. The issues with the ex were the one area that was a little rushed and a less satisfying portion of the book for me. The book also takes jabs at the U.S. itself, which…is not my preference for this venue.

This book fits in well with the theme for Opposites Attract Week as the men are opposites in so many ways. There are the noticeable ones, such as the age difference, their experience level with Emyr being a virgin, as well as the countries they were raised in, and the careers they chose. Then, there are differences that are more subtle between the men as the story unravels. But it’s not all about the opposites as ultimately the men both want to be loved and find peace and security in their daily life.

A distinct highlight was Emyr’s Welsh background, which offered great accented dialogue not often seen and the women in Deckard’s books are often treated with the same respect as the men, which is definitely a bonus. Most of this author’s other works fall into the darker range, so if you are looking to try something from him and are looking for something lighter– as well as something to get your kink on– this book by Bey Deckard is an excellent choice.

 

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Comments

  1. I’m sorry but after having read this book this feels like yet another one of those reviews that smacks of delegitimizing a queer author’s voice. I think there was no “jab” at the USA, just an honest reflection of what it’s like being a queer

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